Other BPD Treatments

Other psychological treatments which weren’t specifically developed for BPD, have been used to treat this disorder include those which focus on social learning theory and conflict resolution. These types of solution-focused therapies, though, often neglect the core problem of people who suffer from this disorder — difficulty in expressing appropriate emotions (and emotional attachments) to significant people in their lives due to faulty cognitions.

For example, Family Therapy and Systemic Therapy has been used to address the dysfunctional living context of the client. Transference-focused therapy for BPD is a psychotherapy that focuses on using your relationship with your therapist to change how you relate to people in the world. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has been used to treat the depression, anxiety and/or co-morbid trauma or substance misuse.



Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT)

CAT is a form of psychological therapy initially developed in the United Kingdom by Anthony Ryle. This time-limited therapy was developed in the context of the NHS with the aim of providing effective and affordable psychological treatment which could be realistically provided in a resource constrained public health system. It is distinctive due to its intensive use of reformulation, its integration of cognitive and analytic practice and its collaborative nature, involving the patient very actively in their treatment.

The CAT practitioner aims to work with the patient to identify procedural sequences; chains of events, thoughts, emotions and motivations that explain how a target problem (for example self-harm) is established and maintained. In addition to the procedural sequence model, a second distinguishing feature of CAT is the use of reciprocal roles (RRs). These identify problems as occurring between people and not within the patient. RRs may be set up in early life and then be replayed in later life; for example someone who as a child felt neglected by parents perceived as abandoning might be vulnerable to feelings of abandonment in later life (or indeed neglect themselves).

Our Borderline Personality Disorder Portal

The following pages are designed to provide additional information and advice on BPD treatment and our approach: